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Coronavirus (COVID-19) FAQs for CPV passengers and drivers

Updated 27 May 2020

Information on this page

About coronavirus

What is coronavirus?

Coronavirus (COVID-19) is a respiratory illness caused by a new virus. Coronaviruses can make humans and animals sick. Some coronaviruses can cause illness similar to the common cold and others can cause more serious illness, such as SARS. Symptoms of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) can include fever, chills, sweats, cough, sore throat, runny nose, partial or complete loss of sense of smell, fatigue or tiredness and shortness of breath, and symptoms can take up to 14 days to develop.

In some cases, headache, muscle soreness, stuffy nose, nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea may present as symptoms.

How is COVID-19 transmitted?

COVID-19 spreads through close contact with an infected person, mostly face-to-face or within a household. It cannot jump across a room or be carried for long distances in the air.

What is a "close contact"?

A "close contact" is someone who has been face-to-face for at least 15 minutes with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19, or been in the same closed space for at least two hours, when that person was potentially infectious. Close contact can include:

  • living in the same household or household-like setting (for example a boarding school or hostel)
  • direct contact with the bodily fluids or laboratory specimens of a confirmed case
  • a person who spent two hours or longer in the same room
  • face-to-face contact for more than 15 minutes with the case in any other setting not listed above.

Being a close contact means there is significant risk of becoming infected with novel coronavirus.

How can I reduce my risk of COVID-19?

Take the following steps to reduce your exposure and chances of getting ill with COVID-19:

  • Wash hands often with soap and running water, for at least 20 seconds. Dry with paper towel or hand dryer. Hands should be washed before and after eating, after going to the toilet, and when you have visited shops or other places.
  • Try not to touch your eyes, nose or mouth.
  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. If you don’t have a tissue cough or sneeze into your upper sleeve or elbow. If a tissue is used, dispose of it immediately into a rubbish bin and wash your hands.
  • Clean and disinfect high touch surfaces and objects after each passenger and after each driver with recommended products. See this section for more information about vehicle cleaning.
  • Stop shaking hands or kissing as a greeting.
  • Stay at home if you feel sick. If you take medication make sure you have enough.
  • Get vaccinated for flu (influenza) when available. It is not yet known whether COVID-19 could significantly increase the risks of influenza infection.
  • Phone your doctor or the DHHS hotline – 1800 675 398 – if you need medical attention. They will tell you what to do.
  • Continue healthy habits: exercise, drink water, get plenty of sleep.
  • Wearing a face mask is not necessary if you are well.
  • Buy an alcohol-based sanitiser with over 60 per cent alcohol.
  • Avoid crowds if possible. If not, keep the time short.
  • Avoid non-essential travel.
  • Do not share drink bottles, crockery or cutlery.

What is ‘social distancing’?

Social distancing is one way to help slow the spread of viruses such as COVID-19. It involves changing your social habits to reduce the risk of transmission. Social distancing can help both yourself and others in the community. Social distancing is effective but please note that social distancing alone cannot eliminate the risk of transmission. Social distancing includes:

  • staying home when unwell
  • avoiding large crowds and gatherings which are non-essential
  • avoiding small gatherings in enclosed spaces which are non-essential
  • keeping a distance of 1.5 metres between yourself and others
  • avoiding visiting vulnerable people, such as those in aged care facilities or hospitals, or people with compromised immune systems due to illness or medical treatment, and
  • minimising contact such as shaking hands, hugging and kissing especially with people at higher risk, such as people with the elderly and those with existing medical conditions.

What is self-isolation?

Self-isolation means you must stay at home for 14 days. You must not leave your home/hotel unless it is an emergency. If you are isolating at home, ask others who are not in isolation to get food and necessities for you. You must not go to public places such as work or shopping centres. You must not let visitors in. Only people who usually live with you should be in your home.

Who needs to self-isolate?

You must self-isolate if you have COVID-19, if you have been in close contact with a confirmed case of COVID-19, or if you arrived in Australia after midnight on 15 March 2020. For more details see here.

Where can I go to be tested for COVID-19?

If you feel unwell, stay at home and away from others. If you have serious symptoms, such as breathing difficulty, call 000 and ask for an ambulance and mention if you also have a fever, cough, sore throat or a respiratory illness.

If you are concerned that you have symptoms, however mild, including fever, chills or sweats, cough, sore throat, shortness of breath or loss of sense of smell, call your general practitioner (GP), the 24-hour coronavirus hotline on 1800 675 398 or use the DHHS online self assessment tool. In some cases, headache, muscle soreness, stuffy nose, nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea may present as symptoms.

The Getting tested for coronavirus (COVID-19) page details where testing can take place.

If your GP refers you to a pathology collection centre to get tested, you will need a referral letter from your GP. However, not all pathology collection centres are testing for COVID-19.

The Australian Government has also got GP respiratory clinics around the country to assess people with COVID-19 symptoms.

You must book an appointment online or phone ahead as they are not drop-in services.

Visit the Australian Government Department of Health website for details on these clinics.

These clinics are being rolled out in phases and contact lists will be updated regularly.

I am feeling stressed and overwhelmed about COVID-19, who can I contact for help?

It is normal to feel overwhelmed and stressed during a time like this. It’s important to remind yourself that this is a normal reaction and it will pass.

There are plenty of ways to support other people, or be supported if you are feeling anxious or uncertain.

Lifeline Australia 13 11 14

A crisis support service offering short term support at any time for people who are having difficulty coping or staying safe.

www.lifeline.org.au

Kids Helpline 1800 551 800

A free, private and confidential 24/7 phone and online counselling service for young people aged 5 to 25 years.

www.kidshelpline.com.au

Beyond Blue 1300 224 636

Mental health information and support for all Victorians.

www.beyondblue.org.au

Headspace 1800 650 893

Online and telephone support and counselling for 12-25 year olds, their families and friends.

Driver FAQs

or go to Passenger FAQs

Working during the pandemic

Keeping vehicles clean

If you have symptoms, catch coronavirus or are in contact with someone with it

Financial and business issues

Working during the pandemic

Is there a limit on the number of passengers that can travel in a commercial passenger vehicle?

There isn’t a limit on the number of passengers, however where possible, passengers should sit in the back seat. Drivers should set the air-conditioning to external airflow instead of recirculation and make hand sanitiser available for passengers where possible.

Booking service providers may choose to implement their own passenger limits. Please check with your preferred booking service provider if they have introduced any limits or additional safety measures.

The Stay at Home Directions do not prohibit a commercial passenger vehicle from carrying more than one passenger. The passenger(s) may only use a commercial passenger vehicle to travel for a permitted purpose, but the driver does not have to ascertain whether the passenger has a valid reason.

Can a passenger use a commercial passenger vehicle to travel if they are required to self-isolate due to international travel or close contact with a confirmed COVID-19 case, and do I have to take them?

From midnight on 28 March 2020 all international arrivals to Australia will be transferred to a hotel and placed in quarantine for 14 days. These passengers will be transported by dedicated Skybus services and taken directly and securely to hotels. This means there will be no international passenger pickups by commercial passenger vehicles until further notice.

We understand this is tough for drivers. This decision has been made in order to save lives by containing the spread of COVID-19.

There may still be some arrivals on domestic flights. Wherever possible, these passengers should use a personal mode of transport to minimise exposure to others.

If any passenger that’s required to self-isolate needs to use a commercial passenger vehicle to travel to a location for isolation, the Federal Department of Health has advised them to take the following precautions:

  • wear a surgical mask, if available
  • avoid direct contact with other passengers, drivers and transport staff
  • practise good hand hygiene and cough/sneeze hygiene:
    • wash their hands frequently with soap and water, before and after eating, and after going to the toilet
    • cover their cough and sneeze with a tissue or cough/sneeze into their elbow or upper arm, dispose of tissues after use, and use a hand sanitiser that contains at least 60 per cent alcohol to clean hands afterwards
    • and if unwell, avoid contact with others (stay more than 1.5 metres from people).

If you believe that a passenger has not taken the above precautions and you cannot provide a safe service, then you may choose to refuse or terminate the trip.

Group transport of at-risk people, including older people should be avoided where possible.

It is never OK to refuse or cancel a trip based on a passenger’s nationality, disability or cultural background. There are equal opportunity and anti-discrimination laws that apply to fare refusal. You should also be mindful of passenger safety at all times.

Can I still pick up passengers arriving via the domestic airport terminals?

Yes, you can continue to pick-up passengers that arrive on domestic flights to Victorian airports.

For up-to-date information visit the Melbourne Airport website.

New 22/5/20: Can drivers pick up and drop off passengers from multiple addresses?

The Stay at Home Directions do not prohibit a commercial passenger vehicle from carrying more than one passenger, or from picking up at multiple addresses. The passenger(s) may only use a commercial passenger vehicle to travel for a permitted purpose, but the driver does not have to ascertain whether the passenger has a valid reason.

New 22/5/20: How far can drivers travel in the State of Victoria to pick up passengers?

A commercial passenger vehicle can pick up a passenger anywhere in Victoria, but long-distance travel should be minimised.

While there is no limitation on the distance that can be travelled, it is important that all Victorians limit travel to help minimise the potential spread of COVID-19.

Travelling long distances to visit family and friends where it is not necessary and where staying overnight is not in line with one of the five approved reasons to leave home should both be avoided.

CPVV also expects all industry participants to comply with any border control arrangements in place if the trip ends in another state.

Can drivers choose not to work if they are worried about contracting the virus? Can their employer sack them?

The advice from the Chief Health Officer is currently to go about business as normal. Individual circumstances will depend on employment contracts and we encourage drivers to seek advice from their booking service provider about the arrangements to support drivers during this time.

Updated 27/5/20: Can driving instructors continue to work?

Under the Stay at Home Direction that took effect from 11:59pm on Tuesday 12 May 2020, there are no limits on attending driving lessons but both students and instructors are advised to be mindful of their own safety and hygiene, and ensure they do not proceed with driving lessons if they have any symptoms, however mild. Staying mindful of hygiene includes washing hands and cleaning and disinfecting high touch surfaces after each passenger and after each driver, with recommended products. See this section for further details about vehicle cleaning.

Driving instructor authorisation

Due to Coronavirus (COVID-19), Commercial Passenger Vehicles Victoria (CPVV) have paused issuing renewals for currently authorised driving instructors. This means some driving instructors will be authorised, but may not be in possession of an up-to-date Authority card or ID card to prove this. To check whether a driving instructor is currently authorised, please visit the Public Register and enter their DIA number.

Updated 26/5/20: Can I go to my driving lesson?

Under the new directions, you are able to practise driving as well as attend driving lessons. Victorians are being asked to use common sense when it comes to travelling. Both students and instructors are advised to be mindful of their own safety and hygiene, and ensure they do not proceed with driving lessons if they have any symptoms, however mild. Staying mindful of hygiene includes washing hands and cleaning and disinfecting high touch surfaces after each passenger and after each driver with recommended products. See this section for more information on cleaning.

What should I do if I suspect or am aware of someone in breach of gathering and social distancing guidelines?

Victoria Police has established a task force to enforce containment measures put in place to combat the spread of COVID-19. Victoria Police are conducting spot checks and are regularly acting on information from the public.

All members of the community have a responsibility to report any concerning activity to Victoria Police. This includes individuals or groups ignoring the restrictions around gatherings, or those suspected of failing to self- isolate. There are significant penalties in place for those found to be breaching restrictions around gatherings or failing to self-isolate.

For example a CPV driver may pick up or drop off a passenger or passengers to a large gathering, or may be aware of an individual who is not self-isolating.

Anyone aware of concerning activity is encouraged to contact Crimestoppers on 1800 333 000.

Updated 26/5/20: Can I ask passengers to apply disinfectant hand sanitiser?

While you can’t demand a passenger apply hand sanitiser, you can certainly offer hand sanitiser to your passengers. You should also clean and disinfect surfaces in your vehicle which you and your passengers touch, after each passenger and each driver, with recommended products. See this section for more information on cleaning.

You should also wash your own hands thoroughly with soap and water, or hand sanitiser with at least 60 per cent alcohol, regularly.

Can I refuse cash as payment?

We recognise that cash may not be your preferred payment method in this environment. Digital and contactless payment methods may assist in reducing contact between drivers and passengers. If you do decide to receive cash, you should wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water or use hand sanitiser with at least 60 per cent alcohol after handling it.

Avoid touching your face with unwashed hands.

Find information on handling digital payments safely here.

Should I wear personal protective equipment (PPE)?

Current advice from the Chief Medical Officer is that you do not need to wear a mask if you are healthy. If you are unwell, you should not drive.

If your booking service provider provides you with masks, you may choose to wear them.

Updated 26/5/20: Will commercial passenger vehicle inspections still be completed?

Commercial passenger vehicle inspections can continue. However, vehicle owners and inspectors are both strongly encouraged to practise social distancing, by remaining 1.5 metres from one another where possible, washing hands regularly using soap and water or hand sanitiser with at least 60 per cent alcohol and practising good hand hygiene. Vehicle owners and inspectors should clean and disinfect high touch surfaces in the vehicle after each passenger and every driver, with recommended products. See this section for further information on cleaning.

If vehicle inspectors are not confident that they can implement these measures and provide a safe environment for themselves and their students, they should not operate.

Temporary changes to medical self-assessment for CPV drivers during COVID-19

As one of a number of measures that CPVV Is putting into place to reduce pressure on the state’s health services during COVID-19, from 13 May 2020 until further notice, anyone applying for accreditation as a commercial passenger vehicle or bus driver will not have to submit a medical report from a doctor.

Applicants can instead complete a medical self-assessment, on the basis that successful applicants will be asked to provide a full doctor’s report once restrictions relating to COVID‑19 are lifted.

This is a temporary measure designed to minimise pressure on the Victorian health system and to reduce the burden of existing regulatory processes during COVID-19. It takes into account industry feedback on difficulties drivers are experiencing in making appointments with their doctors. It will also make it easier for new drivers to enter the commercial passenger vehicle industry at a time when CPV services are essential.

Safeguards remain in place to protect the public. All accredited drivers are required to notify CPVV within seven days of any changes to their health which may affect their fitness to provide commercial passenger vehicle or bus services. Action will be taken against any new applicants who have their accreditation approved and are later found to have submitted false information on their medical self-assessment.

CPVV will be contacting currently accredited drivers who are due to submit a follow-up medical report with instructions on how to manage this process during COVID-19. In the meantime, these drivers can continue to provide CPV or bus services.

Keeping vehicles clean

Updated 27/5/20: How can I keep my vehicle clean to minimise the impact of the virus?

You should clean and disinfect high touch surfaces in your vehicle after each passenger and after each driver with recommended products. See the rest of this section for more information on cleaning. You should also wash your own hands thoroughly with soap and water, or hand sanitiser with at least 60 per cent alcohol, regularly.

Avoid touching your face with unwashed hands.

Keep a box of tissues in your car, and if you do cough or sneeze, use a tissue, dispose of it straight away and then wash your hands. In the event of a passenger or driver spreading droplets (such as sneezing, coughing or vomiting), drivers should clean high touch surfaces after each passenger and after each driver, with recommended products. See elsewhere in this section for more detail about high touch areas and cleaning frequency.

New 27/5/20: What is a high touch surface?

A high touch surface is any surface that drivers and/or passenger touch regularly. For example:

  • steering wheel and controls
  • keys
  • door handles (including the boot handle)
  • window controls
  • rear view mirror adjuster
  • hand brake
  • gear stick
  • heat/air conditioner controls
  • navigation/radio controls
  • visors
  • rear view mirror
  • seat belt clips
  • centre console
  • radio mouthpiece (if applicable)
  • glove box (if used).

New 27/5/20: How regularly should I clean my vehicle?

High touch surfaces that are likely to be touched by passengers should be cleaned after each passenger and before the next trip commences. High touch surfaces that are only touched by the driver should be cleaned at the end of each driver's shift. This may be required multiple times a day if multiple drivers use the vehicle.

Updated 26/5/20: What cleaning and disinfectant products are recommended?

Information on cleaning and disinfection principles for COVID-19, including the use of disinfectant solution, is available here.

Products containing bleach, alcohol or hydrogen peroxide should be used to clean high touch surfaces in vehicles. It is important to note the instructions on the cleaning product and leave the product on the surface for some time before wiping away. Vehicle manufacturing guides should also be referred to when selecting an appropriate chemical or wipe to be used to minimise risk of damage, especially for any touch screens.

In particular:

  • alcohol solutions should be at a concentration of 70 per cent and should remain on the high touch surface for at least 30 seconds before wiping away
  • bleach solutions should be left on high touch surfaces that won't be damaged by bleach for at least 10 minutes before wiping away, and
  • hydrogen peroxide is usually manufactured with a concentration of 3 per cent. It should be used as it is or diluted to a 0.5 per cent concentration and it should be left on surfaces for at least a minute before it is wiped away.

When these products are not available, an alternative disinfectant/disinfectant wipe should be used. If an alternative disinfectant is used, it should be left on the surface for a few minutes prior to wiping away.

You should wipe high touch surfaces with disinfectant wipe or a cloth containing disinfectant.

When using chemicals:

  • Check the label and use according to manufacturer's instructions
  • Be aware of the hazards associated with the product's use and always ensure you use the correct PPE as per the label or Safety Data Sheet (SDS)
  • Avoid eye and skin contact
  • Do not mix cleaning products with other chemicals
  • Where decanting is required, ensure bottles are labelled in accordance with regulations
  • Ensure manufacturer's instructions are followed for any equipment surfaces (eg rolling stock cabs, touch screens in vehicles).

Updated 26/5/20: Does the coronavirus survive on surfaces?

The Victorian DHHS has advised studies suggest that coronavirus (COVID-19) may persist on surfaces for a few hours or up to several days. This may vary under different conditions such as the type of surface, temperature or humidity of the environment.

If you think a surface on your vehicle may be infected, clean it with recommended products to kill the virus. See the rest of this section for more information about vehicle cleaning.

In general, to avoid contact with the virus, clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand rub or wash them with soap and water often. Avoid touching your eyes, mouth or nose.

Will the government help booking service providers to source cleaning products?

As part of the COVID-19 Cross Industry Taskforce, CPVV is assisting booking service providers in requesting personal protective equipment (PPE), hygiene and cleaning products.

The Taskforce has set up a supply chain to assist public transport providers in getting access to important products. The quantity and categories of products available will vary.

The Taskforce will make an assessment for each request and allocate products based on supply and demand. Booking service providers will be invoiced for products provided on a cost recovery basis.

Registered booking service providers can request products online here.

What cleaning products are available for purchase through CPVV?

Availability will be reviewed daily and the online request form updated as required.

If you have symptoms, catch coronavirus or are in contact with someone with it

What happens if I test positive for coronavirus (COVID-19) or have been instructed to self-isolate?

If you have tested positive for COVID-19 and have been directed to self-isolate, this means that you have been infected with COVID-19 and there is a risk that you could spread the virus to other people. Please read the information on ‘confirmed case’ factsheet for patients provided on the DHHS website. You must follow those instructions immediately.

You must also notify CPVV immediately. You will be served with a Prohibition Notice requiring you to cease providing commercial passenger vehicle services immediately. There are significant court penalties for non-compliance with a Prohibition Notice.

Once you receive a medical clearance certificate from a doctor or Public Health Officer confirming you are no longer infectious and can cease your self-isolation, please contact CPVV at case.assessment@cpv.vic.gov.au so that we can arrange for the reinstatement of your driver accreditation.

Until then, you must remain in self-isolation and must not provide any commercial passenger vehicle services.

What happens if I display symptoms, have been tested for coronavirus (COVID-19) and I am awaiting results?

If you are displaying symptoms and have been tested for COVID-19 and awaiting results, there is a risk that you could have COVID-19 infection and could spread the virus to other people. Please read the information on the ‘suspected case’ factsheet for patients provided on the DHHS website. You must follow those instructions immediately.

You must also notify CPVV immediately. You will be served with a Prohibition Notice requiring you to cease providing commercial passenger vehicle services immediately. There are significant court penalties for non-compliance with a Prohibition Notice.

If you receive confirmation from a doctor or Public Health Officer that you have tested negative for COVID-19 and can cease your self-isolation, please contact CPVV at case.assessment@cpv.vic.gov.au so that we can arrange for the reinstatement of your driver accreditation.

Until then, you must remain in self-isolation and must not provide any commercial passenger vehicle services.

What if I have been in close contact with a confirmed case for coronavirus (COVID-19)?

If you have been identified by Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) as having had close contact with someone diagnosed with COVID-19, you will be required to self-isolate for 14 days.

A Public Health Officer from the DHHS will be in contact with you daily to monitor you for symptoms.

Being in close contact means there is a significant risk of becoming infected COVID-19. Please read the information on the ‘close contact’ factsheet for patients provided on the DHHS website. You must follow those instructions immediately.

You must also notify CPVV immediately. You will be served with a Prohibition Notice requiring you to cease providing commercial passenger vehicle services immediately. There are significant court penalties for non-compliance with a Prohibition Notice.

If you receive confirmation from a doctor or Public Health Officer that you can cease your self-isolation, please contact CPVV at case.assessment@cpv.vic.gov.au so that we can arrange for the reinstatement of your driver accreditation.

Until then, you must remain in self-isolation and must not provide any commercial passenger vehicle services.

What happens if I display symptoms for coronavirus (COVID-19)?

If you are feeling unwell, you should cease providing commercial passenger vehicle services.

Furthermore, if you are displaying symptoms for COVID-19, you should immediately contact the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) dedicated hotline on 1800 675 398 (24 hours, 7 days a week) for advice.

What are booking service providers required to do if one of their drivers becomes a suspected or confirmed COVID-19 case, or is required to self-isolate?

Booking service providers are asked to report instances of drivers who are suspected/confirmed COVID-19 cases or have been required to self-isolate by contacting CPVV at case.assessment@cpv.vic.gov.au.

Financial and business issues

My income has fallen significantly since COVID-19, where can I go for financial support?

The Federal Government has recently announced a number of income support measures to help people affected by the economic impacts of COVID-19.

Please visit treasury.gov.au/coronavirus to determine the support best suited to your circumstances.

I am not an Australian resident for social security purposes, where can I go for financial support?

Centrelink has an online Payment and Service Finder tool to help individuals find support services

I am self-employed, am I eligible for financial assistance?

Yes. Sole traders are eligible to apply for the Commonwealth government’s Jobkeeper payment for sole traders and a range of other financial support measures explained here.

Sole traders may include:

  • accredited commercial passenger vehicle drivers whose business involves driving a registered commercial passenger vehicle that they either own, lease or bail
  • registered commercial passenger vehicle owners who lease or bail their vehicle to accredited commercial passenger vehicle drivers that are self-employed.

The ATO considers you a sole trader if you:

  • use your individual tax file number when lodging your income tax return,
  • report all your income in your individual tax return, using the section for business items to show your business income and expenses (there is no separate business tax return for sole traders),
  • use your ABN for all your business dealings,
  • are registered for Goods and Services Tax (GST),
  • pay tax at the same income tax rates as individual taxpayers,
  • may claim a deduction for any personal super contributions you make after notifying your fund.

Will association fees be reduced by booking service providers?

CPVV does not regulate the association fees set by booking service providers. Booking service providers may choose to reduce, delay or waive their association fees during the COVID-19 pandemic, but this is a decision for them. Government is working with booking service providers to ensure they can provide appropriate support to their associated driver workforce. Please check with your booking service provider if you are unsure what arrangements they have put in place.

Please visit the treasury.gov.au site here for all available financial support for individuals and households.

Is CPVV offering any financial help to drivers during the pandemic?

Commercial Passenger Vehicles Victoria (CPVV) appreciates the financial difficulties that many Victorians are facing during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

To assist, we are pausing the following recurring fees until further notice:

  • Driver accreditation
  • Commercial passenger vehicle registration
  • Driving instructor authority renewal – this includes any renewal invoice received recently
  • Replacement Multi Purpose Taxi Program member cards

No refunds will be available for invoices already paid.

Passenger FAQs

or go to Driver FAQs

When can I use a CPV to travel and where can I travel to?

To limit the spread of COVID-19 in the community, the Victorian Government is directing all Victorians to stay at home. From midnight on 30 March 2020, all Victorians should remain at home, except in limited circumstances.

These circumstances include:

  • to shop for food and other necessary goods and services
  • to access medical services or provide care giving. For example, this includes shared parenting obligations or providing care and support to an unwell, disabled, elderly or pregnant friend or relative
  • to attend work or education (where you cannot do these things remotely)
  • leaving home in an emergency or if required by law.

Therefore, you can travel in a CPV to undertake any of the above activities. For more information about when it is appropriate to travel, visit the DHHS website.

If you are travelling in a CPV, you are required to observe physical distancing, for example, by sitting in the back seat to achieve as much separation as is reasonably possible. Digital and contactless payment methods may also assist in reducing contact between drivers and passengers. If you do pay in cash, you should wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water or hand sanitiser with at least 60 per cent alcohol after handling it.

Can I use a commercial passenger vehicle if I am displaying symptoms of COVID-19?

Wherever possible,unwell passengers should use a personal mode of transport to minimise exposure to others.

If you do need to use a commercial passenger vehicle to travel to a location for isolation and you are displaying symptoms, then you should avoid contact with others (stay more than 1.5 metres from people).

You should sit in the back seat to achieve as much separation as is reasonably possible.

You should use hand sanitisers with at least 60 per cent alcohol, if available.

If the driver believes you have not taken the above precautions and cannot provide a safe service, then the driver may choose to refuse or terminate the trip.

It is never OK for drivers to refuse or cancel a trip based on a passenger’s nationality, disability or cultural background. There are equal opportunity and anti-discrimination laws that apply to fare refusal.

Can I use a commercial passenger vehicle to travel to a place of self-isolation?

Wherever possible,the Federal Department of Health has advised passengers who are required to self-isolate to use a personal mode of transport to minimise exposure to others.

If you need to use a commercial passenger vehicle to travel to a location for isolation, the Federal Department of Health has advised you to take the following precautions:

  • wear a surgical mask, if available
  • avoid direct contact with other passengers, drivers and transport staff
  • practise good hand hygiene and cough/sneeze hygiene:
    • wash your hands frequently with soap and water, before and after eating, and after going to the toilet
    • cover your cough and sneeze with a tissue or cough/sneeze into your elbow or upper arm, dispose of tissues after use, and use a hand sanitiser that contains at least 60 per cent alcohol to clean your hands afterwards, and
    • if unwell, avoid contact with others (stay more than 1.5 metres from people).

If a driver believes you have not taken the above precautions and cannot provide a safe service, then the driver may choose to refuse or terminate the trip. Group transport of at-risk people, including older people, should be avoided where possible.

It is never OK for a driver to refuse or cancel a trip based on a passenger’s nationality, disability or cultural background. There are equal opportunity and anti-discrimination laws that apply to fare refusal.

How is CPVV dealing with suspected or confirmed driver cases?

Confirmed cases

If a confirmed case of COVID-19 amongst the driver community is reported to CPVV, we will serve that driver a Prohibition Notice and remove them from the Public Register until they provide CPVV with evidence from a medical specialist that they are not infectious and are sufficiently fit and healthy to drive a CPV.

Drivers required to self-isolate

CPVV will serve that driver a Prohibition Notice and remove them from the public register:

  1. if they develop symptoms during the self-isolation period, but test negative for COVID-19, until they provide evidence to CPVV of the negative test; or
  2. if they develop symptoms during the self-isolation period and test positive for COVID-19, until they provide evidence from a medical specialist that they are not infectious and are sufficiently fit and healthy to drive a CPV.
  3. if they complete their period of self-isolation without developing symptoms, we’ll add them back onto the public register when the driver confirms that with us.

Can I ask the driver to apply disinfectant hand sanitiser before handling my luggage or giving me change when I have paid in cash?

While you can’t require a driver to use hand sanitiser, you can certainly offer hand sanitiser to the driver.

Can drivers refuse payment in cash?

We recognise that cash may not be a driver’s preferred method of payment in this environment. Digital and contactless payment methods may assist in reducing contact between drivers and passengers. If you do pay in cash, you should wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water or hand sanitiser with at least 60 per cent alcohol after handling it.

Avoid touching your face with unwashed hands.

Should passengers wear personal protective equipment (PPE)?

Current advice from the Chief Medical Officer is that you do not need to wear a mask if you are healthy. If you are unwell and have no option but to use a commercial passenger vehicle service, you should wear a mask.

Updated 26/5/20: Are drivers required to clean their vehicles after each trip to minimise the impact of the virus?

Drivers have been advised to clean and disinfect high touch surfaces in their vehicle after each passenger and after each driver with recommended products. See this section for more information on vehicle cleaning.

They are also advised to wash their own hands thoroughly with soap and water, or use hand sanitiser with at least 60 per cent alcohol, regularly. Guidance on the cleaning of frequently touched surfaces is available here.

It is also recommended that drivers keep a box of tissues in the car.

Updated 22/5/20: Can I go to my driving lesson?

Under the new directions, you are able to practise driving as well as attend driving lessons. Victorians are being asked to use common sense when it comes to travelling. Both students and instructors are advised to be mindful of their own safety and hygiene, and ensure they do not proceed with driving lessons if they have any symptoms, however mild. Staying mindful of hygiene includes washing hands and cleaning and disinfecting high touch surfaces regularly such as steering wheels and doors before and after each lesson.

More information

You can call the National Coronavirus Health Information hotline on 1800 020 080, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

If you suspect you may have COVID-19 call the Victorian Department of Health and Human Services hotline on 1800 675 398, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

If you have concerns about your health, call healthdirect on 1800 022 222 to speak to a registered health nurse.

If your concerns relate to operational issues that affect the commercial passenger vehicle industry, please email safety@cpv.vic.gov.au